amount


amount
amount, number
Amount is normally used with uncountable nouns (i.e. nouns which have no plural) to mean ‘quantity’ (e.g. a reasonable amount of forgiveness, glue, resistance, straw, etc.), and number with plural nouns (e.g. a certain number of boys, houses, jobs, etc.). Amount, however, is fast breaking into the territory of number, especially when the following plural noun is regarded as an aggregate or collection. Examples:

• Fame had magnified the amount of the forces —1849 in OED

• I have any amount of letters for you —George Bernard Shaw, 1893

• I expect you get a fair amount of road accidents on these winding roads —Rachel Billington, 1988

• Billy's had a tremendous amount of problems —T. McGuane, AmE 1989

• Booksellers have less and less space for the amount of books that are being published —The Author, 1990

• The amount of bulbs she would find between the stones next spring —A. Huth, 1991.

Note that quantity can be used with all types of nouns (a large quantity of parcels / a small quantity of sugar).

Modern English usage. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • amount — I (quantity) noun aggregate, bulk, count, extent, magnitude, mass, measure, measurement, net quantity, number, numeration, strength, substance, sum, summa, total, whole associated concepts: amount of evidence, amount of loss foreign phrases:… …   Law dictionary

  • Amount — A*mount , n. 1. The sum total of two or more sums or quantities; the aggregate; the whole quantity; a totality; as, the amount of 7 and 9 is 16; the amount of a bill; the amount of this year s revenue. [1913 Webster] 2. The effect, substance,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • amount — [n1] quantity aplenty, bags*, bulk, bundle, chunk, expanse, extent, flock, gob*, heap, hunk, jillion*, load, lot, magnitude, mass, measure, mess*, mint*, mucho*, number, oodles*, pack, passel, peck, pile, scads*, score, slat*, slew*, supply, ton* …   New thesaurus

  • Amount — A*mount , v. t. To signify; to amount to. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • amount — ► NOUN 1) the total number, size, value, or extent of something. 2) a quantity. ► VERB (amount to) 1) come to be (a total) when added together. 2) be the equivalent of. ORIGIN from Old French amont upward , from Latin a …   English terms dictionary

  • amount — [ə mount′] vi. [ME amounten, to ascend < OFr amonter < amont, upward < a (L ad), to + mont < L montem, acc. sing. of mons, MOUNTAIN] 1. to add up; equal in total [the bill amounts to $4.50] 2. to be equal in meaning, value, or effect… …   English World dictionary

  • Amount — A*mount , v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Amounted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Amounting}.] [OF. amonter to increase, advance, ascend, fr. amont (equiv. to L. ad montem to the mountain) upward, F. amont up the river. See {Mount}, n.] 1. To go up; to ascend. [Obs.]… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • amount to — index aggregate, comprise, consist, reach Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • amount to — (something) to be the same as something else. A decrease in student aid amounts to an increase in tuition fees. She thought he was wrong to take what amounts to a stand against greater freedom. Related vocabulary: add up to something …   New idioms dictionary

  • amount — n *sum, total, quantity, number, aggregate, whole …   New Dictionary of Synonyms


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.